By Airman 1st Class Dennis Hoffman, 21st Space Wing Public Affairs / Published August 31, 2016

Lt. Col. Nicole Roberts, the 21st Security Forces Squadron commander, relies on a personable leadership style to effectively lead her 214 Airmen at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Roberts is affectionately known as “mama bear” around her squadron based on her reputation of always taking care of and protecting her troops. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Dennis Hoffman)

 

 

Lt. Col. Nicole Roberts, the 21st Security Forces Squadron commander, relies on a personable leadership style to effectively lead her 214 Airmen at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Roberts is affectionately known as “mama bear” around her squadron based on her reputation of always taking care of and protecting her troops. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Dennis Hoffman)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- (This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.)

Leadership is not an innate quality and there is no true recipe for success in regards to it. Leadership takes on many forms. Leadership has no preferred race, religion, ethnicity nor gender.

Blind to any categorization, Lt. Col. Nicole Roberts, the 21st Security Forces Squadron commander, accelerated through the enlisted and officer ranks while relying on a personable leadership style she still uses to effectively lead her 214 Airmen on Peterson Air Force Base.

“I have been in the service for 26 years with 11 being in the Army,” Roberts said. “I began as enlisted Army military police and then became a drill sergeant. Once I reached sergeant first class, I was selected for Officer Candidate School where I became an Army military police officer.”

Opportunities arose in Roberts’ career to progress both herself and her leadership and she took full advantage of them. She learned from her enlisted experience and her fellow brothers and sisters in arms and stored that knowledge knowing it would be beneficial to have as an officer, Roberts said.

Following a couple years of soaking up the experience as an officer, Roberts met her future husband. He was in the Air Force and she had heard great things of the Air Force so she decided to transfer between the two services.

“I did what is known as an interservice transfer,” Roberts said. “There was no break in service; one day I was in the Army and the next day I was in the Air Force. It took me awhile to handle the learning curve, but I have been lucky enough and blessed enough that in my entire experience in the Air Force. I have had some great leaders.”

Looking back, Roberts said transitioning to the Air Force was incredibly beneficial to her. She gained valuable mentorship and her leadership style, though already developed, became more refined.

“There is no magic to it,” Roberts said. “Being enlisted for a very long time, I have learned to put my Airmen first. I feel personally responsible for their welfare, safety and training. Their loved ones entrust with me their safety and I really take that to heart. My Airmen are my heartbeat, so I believe that if you love and care for your people, the mission will take care of itself.”

Roberts said that on her bad days, she heads to the gates to stand with, talk and check on her Airmen. She gets a revitalized sense of her duties and her responsibilities when she sees her defenders working long hours in the heat and cold with smiles on their faces.

“She really makes it a point to let you know she is there for you,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Anderson, a member of the 21st SFS. “She is one of the most supportive leaders I have experienced in my six years of being in the Air Force. I have been at the gate and she will come up to me and take my scanner from me and make sure I am doing well. She is a mother figure to all of us in the squadron and we never want to do anything to disappoint her.”

It is with that style, Roberts led the 21st SFS to multiple awards in the Air Force Space Command medium-sized SFS category. Although she accepts the award, she is quick to give credit to her Airmen and her senior NCOs for leading the way. She said the success of the squadron is directly due to how well she and her team have worked together.

With her teams and her career field being predominantly male, Roberts’ leadership style has never succumbed to any negative criticism because of her gender.

“I have been in a male-dominated career field for so long that I overlook a lot of things in that regarding my gender,” Roberts said. “In all honesty, I think the only time my gender really defines me is that my troops call me ‘mama bear’ because my troops know that if anyone messes with them, I’ll break out the claws and have their back.”

Leaving nothing to excuses, Roberts said she embraces herself and her gender but believes that when she dons her sage-green Airman battle uniform, she is like any other Airman and fights the same fight.

“As a female, I have seen other females who are pilots, cops and firemen – I have seen some phenomenal females in action,” she said. “I have always believed that if you work hard and take care of your people, you will get every opportunity that you are supposed to get and the Air Force has done a great job at leveling the playing field for everyone. Ever since I’ve been blue, I’ve been blessed.”

EHRI at Maxwell-Gunter AFB AL to honor A1C Elizabeth Jacobson

The Enlisted heritage Research Institute, Enlisted Heritage Hall at Gunter Annex, in Montgomery, Alabama wishes to honor A1C Elizabeth Jacobson with a dedicated display at the Air Force's only Museum dedicated solely to preserving our Enlisted Heritage. Together with her family, friends, and fellow Security Forces members, we will unveil her display in the Operation Iraqi Freedom wing of the museum in 2017.

We humbly call upon you to help us make this wonderful tribute a reality.   Our goal is to raise $8,000-$10,000 to honor her life and legacy with a life-size likeness of Elizabeth, artifacts, photos, and paintings of her brave service.

Donations from this "go fund me" site https://www.gofundme.com/pxyucar8 will go directly to the Air University Foundation. The Air University Foundation is a non-profit organization and all donations received on this page will be earmarked for A1C Elizabeth Jacobson's dedicated display at the Air Force Enlisted Heritage Hall.

We sincerely appreciate any donations you can give to support our efforts. If you would like to share photos, or memories of Elizabeth, please contact us via message or facebook (links below):

http://afehri.maxwell.af.mil

(Click to view previous displays honoring our Enlisted Airmen)

https://www.facebook.com/Air-Force-Enlisted-Heritage-Research-Institute-247447788604070/info?tab=page_info

This display is going to the first of many that will highlight our Airman's historical events from around the globe. The POC is Erin Panas (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (334) 676-0249) for this effort.

2016 USAF Airmen of the Year

Spotlight: SMSgt. Rebecca McNelley

Air Force Magazine, Daily Report, 13 September 2016

 


SMSgt. Rebecca McNelley, standardization and evaluation superintendent with the 90th Security Forces Group at F.E. Warren AFB, WY. Air Force photo.

  

​SMSgt. Rebecca McNelley, standardization and evaluation superintendent with the 90th Security Forces Group at F.E. Warren AFB, Wyo., is one of the Air Force's 12 Outstanding Airmen of the Year for 2016. McNelley pioneered the 90th Missile Wing's first active-shooter exercise by partnering with the Wyoming Air National Guard and Army National Guard, preparing more than 8,000 personnel to avert such threats. She directed more than 1,000 evaluations and assessments for four squadrons, reducing the number of defenders posted in missile fields by 10 percent. McNelley engineered weekly missile field and weapons storage team visits, covering three squadrons and 17 flights, ensuring 1,200 security forces airmen were nuclear-security ready. She was proactive in the community, managing the Air Force's largest Airman's Attic program and overseeing her wing's loan locker, assisting more than 3,000 families Air Force families.

 

Congratulations SF CSB Candidates!

Defenders - Congratulations on your selection as command candidates for Wing and Group Command.  This is a significant milestone in your careers and is a reflection of your proven leadership and demonstrated potential to take on increased responsibilities.  With (4) Wing Command and (14) Group Command candidates on the slate, we continue to compete exceptionally well for senior leader positions, which is a direct result of your superior performance as leaders within our Service and across the Joint force. Please thank your families for the role they've played in supporting your service as an Airman, take time to celebrate this achievement, and thank the Airmen serving with and for you for being great teammates.  Well done!


Col Gregory Anderson Air Base Wing
Col Brian Greenroad Air Base Wing
Col Jonpaul Mickle Air Base Wing
Col Thomas Sherman Air Base Wing

Lt Col Jason Beck Mission Support Group
Col Matthew Boschert Mission Support Group
Col Ted Breuker Mission Support Group
Lt Col Christopher Bromen Mission Support Group
Col Christopher Callis Mission Support Group
Lt Col Jeffrey Carter Mission Support Group
Lt Col Christopher Deguelle Mission Support Group
Lt Col John Grimm Mission Support Group
Col Aaron Guill Mission Support Group
Col Steven Heffington Mission Support Group
Lt Col Philip Holmes Mission Support Group
Col Don Layne Mission Support Group
Lt Col Leonard Rose Mission Support Group
Col David Williams Mission Support Group

Defensor Fortis,

ANDREA D. TULLOS, Brig Gen, USAF
Director of Security Forces
DCS/Logistics, Engineering & Force Protection

Scott AFB, Alton VFW present ‘Badge of Courage’to 6-year-old Hayden Brown
Bellville News-Democrat, Scott AFB News, 26 Aug 2016

Senior Airman Sheldon Timmermeyer, 375th Security Forces Squadron, got the day started with his new friend Hayden who helped provide the police escort to their first destination of the day. Timmermeyer also helped to coordinate volunteers who played Batman and Joker for the event scenario for which Hayden helped the Airmen to track down. Photo by Senior Airman Megan Friedl

By Senior Airman Megan Friedl, 375th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs

Little 6-year-old Hayden Brown doesn’t get to do what most children his age do because of a rare terminal degenerative disease called Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, commonly referred to as MLD. This condition makes it difficult for him to eat, walk, talk and even show facial expressions.

In recent months, there’s been a rapid decline in Hayden’s health, so in a race to beat the effects of MLD, his father, Jonathan, began working to provide him with as many wonderful childhood memories as he possibly can. They’ve come up with a bucket list of activities, and friends and family are rallying to help Hayden do simple pleasures of life like go camping or ride in a race car.

Recently, Jonathan reached out to Alton’s VFW Post 1308 when he heard about an award they give to children called the “Badge of Courage.” Created by Wayne Able and William Perkins, the Badge of Courage is a way to honor children who show courage and determination through an illness, and they’ve presented medals to numerous children in hospital rooms for the past few years.

The VFW reached out to the Airmen of the 375th Air Mobility Wing to see if they could assist in creating a special event for Hayden, which resulted in developing a “Pilot for a Day” program that included a formal presentation of the medal to him.

“When we heard about this opportunity, we were really excited about supporting this,” said Maj. Geoffrey Ashby, 458th Airlift Squadron assistant operations officer. “More than 30 volunteers came together to give him a day he would remember. Because we knew he likes superheroes, especially Batman, our team created a scenario where Hayden would help the Batman catch the Joker who was eluding us. He was given an assignment and intel brief, trained, given his wings, sat in the cockpit of our C-21 and then helped Batman catch the Joker at the end of the day. Our team got him a flight suit, name tag, hat and captain bars for his assignment, so he would truly be one of us for the day.”

Senior Airman Sheldon Timmermeyer, 375th SFS patrolman, started off the scenario by presenting Hayden with his own SFS beret and then drove him in his police car to his next destination. During the ride, Hayden got a kick out of playing with the sirens and the lights.

“Capt.” Hayden Brown’s first stop in his training was to the 906th Airlift Squadron where he test drove their KC-135 Simulator. Capt. James Quon assisted him on the flight as co-pilot as they made their way to Hawaii for some “training.” During the trip, Hayden was also joined by his younger sister, Kynliegh, who has also been a constant companion for Hayden.

Next, he visited the Air Traffic Control Tower where he viewed the entire base and got to listen to Batman over the radio. Master Sgt. Bill Corriston, 375th Operations Support Squadron, presented him with Air Force coins and patches, and pinned on an Air Traffic Control Occupational Badge.

Upon hearing Batman speak, Hayden burst into a smile. For 1st Lt. Robert Frisch, 458th Airlift Squadron mobility officer and project officer, it was his "absolute favorite part of the day. When we asked him who was talking to him he was able to muster out ‘Bat’ and then began laughing and smiling.”

Once inside, the formal ceremony began where Hayden received his medal along with other goodies the squadron and wing had provided—a t-shirt, patches, certificates, and a model of a C-21 aircraft—all to signify his training was complete and that he was an honorary member of both the 458th AS and the wing.

To keep the Joker off his trail, intel officer 2nd Lt. Kelsey Cullinan explained that he needed to change vehicles and that’s when he rode in a brand new huge snow plow with Senior Airman Ian Clark from the 375th Civil Engineer Squadron. Cullinan continued providing intel updates throughout the scenario and made quick friends with Hayden’s younger sister and constant companion, Kynliegh.

Upon arrival to base operations a team of volunteer Airmen along with the 375th AMW vice commander, Col. Chris Buschur, rendered their salutes as Hayden arrived.

There he met with some K-9s and their handlers, and with Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians who showed Hayden the robot they use for demolition.

Once inside, the formal ceremony began where Hayden received his medal along with other goodies the squadron and wing had provided—a t-shirt, patches, certificates, and a model of a C-21 aircraft—all to signify his training was complete and that he was an honorary member of both the 458th AS and the wing.

Visibly moved by this show of affection, Jonathan would later write on a Facebook group he has created for Hayden, called “Love for Hayden Bentley Brown,” that his gratitude for the base and the VFW was “enormous. True love was shown today that will never be lost.”

Able added, “The Air Force went above and beyond. To Hayden, this day meant a happy memory. It’s something he will never forget.”

Now that he was an official member of the unit and had completed his “training,” the unit prepped him for his real mission with a weather update and pilot notams, then Frisch escorted Hayden to the C-21 to see what it’s like to be a pilot. He listened into the tower folks who relayed some updated information about Batman over the radio.

Then the 375th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters arrived and greeted Hayden with a burst of water from their fire truck and demonstrated a fire rescue for Hayden.

The VFW reached out to the Airmen of the 375th Air Mobility Wing to see if they could assist in creating a special event for Hayden, which resulted in developing a “Pilot for a Day” program that included a formal presentation of the medal to him.

Then Batman arrived onto the flight line in one of the security forces’ newly acquired vehicles that resembles a batmobile. Hayden helped Batman catch the Joker and throw him in the police car to complete the day’s mission.

Brown stated online that, “These folks really went way above and beyond to show my son that life’s about smiling and enjoying life. In these tough times, this kind of gathering of countless people coming together to keep that amazing smile going is something I am very thankful for … My little man went to sleep smiling.”

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